Campus Ministry Opinion

From the Editor: April 13th, 2018

Written by Christine Gill

Hi there!

All my life I have had a passion for sailing. I began sailing when I was three years old and the flame has never died out in me. Along with my passion for the sea, I also know a lot of legends and stories about maritime incidents throughout history. There is one that always strikes fear into my heart.

In the early morning hours of April 15th, 1912, the RMS Titanic (a White Star Line ocean-liner) sank after colliding with an iceberg. The crew of the RMS Titanic was given multiple warnings of icebergs and to avoid those areas. They ignored them because the ship was said to be unsinkable. The ship collided with the iceberg on the starboard side below the waterline and the watertight compartments that were designed to stop the flooding failed.

The ship was originally designed to have enough lifeboats to have all 2,200 people on board be saved. The executives of The White Star Line decided to have the amount of lifeboats cut in half because they thought that the deck looked too cluttered with the proper amount of lifeboats. The lifeboats were designed to hold 65 people but they only launched them half full. There were 2,200 passengers on board. They could have saved many more but they launched the few lifeboats well below capacity and only 700 people made it off the Titanic alive. The RMS Titanic completely went under around 2:20 in the morning on April 15th, 1912. The temperature of the water was 28 degrees Fahrenheit. Roughly 1,500 people perished.

The RMS Titanic is the only commercial vessel to sink by colliding with an iceberg. Sunday April 15th, 2018 will be the 106th anniversary of the disaster. As a sailor I observe the anniversary of this tragedy and am struck by how convinced people were that any ship could not be sunk. This event was a huge lesson for humanity.

Yours Truly,

Kieran Arnold,

Chief Editor, Knightly News

 

Photo: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RMS_Titanic

 

 

About the author

Christine Gill